High or Low Carry Methods

I can build your knife’s vertical sheath to hang below or above your belt line. Each method of “high” or “low” carry has features that may be of interest to you. For your reference I have provided two sets of photos below. Each set, with a front and back view, are the same knife model but each hanging from a black belt is in a high and low sheath. When building a “high” carry sheath, see the ones on the left in each photo. I fold the belt loop down behind the sheath. When worn, the knife handle will be above the belt line. The knife is then out of the way when sitting down, doesn’t flop around when walking, and is out of sight when out in public just by pulling your shirt or coat down over it. When building a “low” carry sheath, see the ones on the right in each photo, I fold the longer belt loop up behind the knife handle. When worn, the knife and sheath hangs below the belt line such as a very large knife like a Bowie with a crown stag handle. This method of carry keeps the handle from poking you under the arm or in the ribs. The knife may flop around when walking if it’s a large knife so a leg tie-down system is recommended.

1

Model 304 Gut-Hook Skinner

Left Sheath High – Front

2

Model 304 Gut-Hook Skinner

Right Sheath Low – Back

3

Model 209 Hunter’s Bowie

Left Sheath High – Front

4

Model 209 Hunter’s Bowie

Right Sheath Low – Back

 

high-low-carry-methods#6 High or Low Carry Methods A very old method of carrying large knives, like Bowies, was to simply stick the sheath into ones waist sash. Tighening up the sash or belt, kept it in place. For added security, a “Sam Brown Button Stud” attached to the front of the sheath, rested on top of the sash or belt. This simple method allowed the knife to be carried vertically, or the knife could be slanted forward, for an easier cross draw.
Image shows vertical carry and forward slant carry

A 1960’s era Puma knife sheath, in dark brown, with the worst case of dry rot I’ve seen in a long time. We built a replacement for it, as a right handed, low carry design. However, rather than use copper rivets around the outside to keep the blade from cutting through, I built my sheaths with a 1/2 inch welt around the outside edge to protect the stitching.

Fronts 

Backs